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Ringo's Losing Feathers


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#41 Allee

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 09:25 PM

I bet that's funny, hearing Ringo squawk like an angry quaker. What is Ringo saying now? Does she talk a lot?

#42 Siobhan

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 11:09 PM

Probably only her mommy can understand what she says -- it's all pretty garbled, though she can say "who's my baby" pretty clearly. But she says "I love you" and "Ringo" and "peekaboo" too and she whistles Beethoven and Andy Griffith and Johnny's signature whistle, which he made up and can do at a piercing volume you can hear all over the house. LOL She can do the Quaker flock call and the tiels' flock call, and a passable cardinal impersonation she learned from Clyde, not from cardinals. She does some generic squawking when she's mad, and she says "IKE" when she's startled, which could be her version of "Yikes" or just something she made up. She has a longer sentence I can't make out, but I often say "Mommy loves Ringo" to her and it could be that. I'm trying to get her to say "pretty girl" but I haven't heard anything that could be that yet. I also say "Mommy loves her baby" to her a lot and the longer sentence could be that. Like some Quakers, she likes to practice in private (or what she believes to be private) and she talks a LOT when I'm in her room drying my hair and she thinks I can't hear her because of the hair dryer. LOL


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#43 Allee

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 05:16 PM

Zeke does his practicing when no one is in the room with him. He will work on one word or phrase for several days until he gets it right. Harry can hear something one time and repeat it perfectly but only if she wants to. I can't get her to say, Be a good GIRL for love or money.

Poor Popeye has the strangest language. I love his indoor voice as garbled as it is. It's like hearing a toddler say something that makes no sense to anyone but the child's parents. They understand every syllable and know how to respond. After four months I can recognize a few words from Popeye besides the few things he says plainly. When I move him out of the bird room so the Quakers can come out he says, bye bye Popeye, and waves his foot. I love you, and mamma's bird aren't as clear but I've heard them enough to know that's what he's saying. He'll have a hard time catching up with the Quakers.

#44 Siobhan

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 05:32 PM

Popeye sounds charming enough to get by on personality without having to talk a lot, too. wub.png



#45 Allee

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 09:20 AM

He is a charmer, no doubt about it. He has a birdie crush on my husband but Joe has admitted he isn't quite past his fear of Popeye's awesome beak. Joe spent several hours adding locks to Popeye's feed cup doors because the little monkey loves locks and had the ones on his cage figured out. While Joe was working on the locks, Popeye was working on Joe's soft heart and good nature. :)

#46 Siobhan

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 01:26 PM

We were told by a local pet store owner that big parrots don't bite, they "stab" with their beaks. Be that as it may ... LOL Still, I'm also told that cockatoos are teddy bears and very affectionate.



#47 cnyguy

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 08:25 PM

We were told by a local pet store owner that big parrots don't bite, they "stab" with their beaks. Be that as it may ... LOL Still, I'm also told that cockatoos are teddy bears and very affectionate.

 

I can attest from personal experience that pet store owner was very much mistaken. biggrin.png I've been chomped by a couple big Macaws and one of the worst parrot bites I've ever had was from a Rose-breasted Cockatoo, who apparently must be the exception to the "teddy bear" rule. She's about the only 'Too I've met that wasn't affectionate.



#48 Siobhan

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 02:37 AM

I thought he was wrong, because I've done a couple of stories about big birds, and other people have told me how nasty a bite from a big parrot can be. Besides, if the little ones bite, why wouldn't the big ones?



#49 Allee

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 06:45 PM

Popeye's a lover not a biter! :) But he is a U2 male and he does have his own opinions and likes to argue. I work with him every day and he hasn't bitten me yet but I respect that beak. I think we're pretty much finished with the testing stage and he knows what he can get away with. I have heard those horror stories though. U2's have a bad rep.

The person that told you big parrots stab and don't bite wanted to sell a bird. I have seen the larger birds strike with a closed beak. I've also seen them destroy a block of wood. In the right mood they can deliver a nerve damaging bite.

I feel for you Gary. Those little galah's and Goffin's tend to be quite nippy when they get excited.

#50 cnyguy

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 08:20 PM

Both times I was bitten by Macaws it wasn't a serious bite, but definitely wasn't a stab. More of a warning bite: "back off, pal, or I could break that finger in two."

 

That Rose-breasted Cockatoo was placidly enjoying head-scratches, and faster than lightning, she turned and chomped down good and hard on my thumb. ohmy.png The man who works in the pet store apologized profusely, but I told him I've been around parrots enough to expect that there's a good chance I'll get bit, even by a friendly parrot. biggrin.png 



#51 Siobhan

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 09:11 PM

Of course he wanted to sell a bird, and I wanted to buy one. He had a macaw -- blue and gold, I think -- who had plucked him/herself almost entirely bald. My husband asked me out of the owner's earshot if I'd seen that bird and I said I had and told him that's often either a skin condition or stress, but not always. Since we could see the bird's skin and it looked normal, my guess is stress. Two of them were sharing a cage that I would put ONE Quaker in alone.The door was open, so they could come out, but still. I wanted to take that bald birdy home and pamper her and get her out of that place.



#52 Allee

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 10:45 PM

I can't believe shop owners can get by with that. It's crossed my mind that it may be intentional so people like us will take pity and pay the ransom to help the birds.

#53 Jan Cullen

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 03:47 AM

Allee, some people just see dollar signs when they look at animals and don't care about their health or wellbeing.  I doubt the guy would have the intelligence enough to make it intentional.  I reckon he is just a lazy so and so who couldn't care less.  A pox on him angry.png