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Faq - Bringing Your New Quaker Home


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38 replies to this topic

#21 LyricsMomma

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Posted 04 July 2011 - 02:09 PM

What are some books that I might want to read prior to bringing home my first bird?


The most often recommended book by members of QuakerParrots.com is Guide To The Quaker Parrot by Mattie Sue Athan. This is an inexpensive book and a great resource for any one who owns a Quaker parrot. A couple other books that are great for information are:

1) Guide To A Well-Behaved Parrot by Mattie Sue Athan
2) Guide To Companion Parrot behavior by Mattie Sue Athan
3) Birds for Dummies by Gina Spadafori and Dr. Brian L. Speer
4) Quaker Parrots Made Easy by Shelly Lane (Click~Here for link)



I bought and read Quaker Parrots made easy by Shelly Lane. Great book!!! So much information and so easy to understand for beginners!

#22 Tibby

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Posted 10 July 2011 - 07:36 AM

I just brought home my 6 week old Blue Quaker yesterday. She doesn't seem interested in eating or drinking. She is not moving around much at all. Is this unusual? Our green Quaker was 3 months old when we brought her home and din't notice any of this. Thank you.

#23 jaytee

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Posted 11 July 2011 - 12:00 AM

If your baby is only 6 weeks, she needs Hand Feeding. Do you know how to hand feed? If not, she needs to go back to the breeder, until weaned. If you do know how tho hand feed, She just moved into a whole new world. :o It's common for a a bird to not eat, play, be active in a new home, for a day or so. ;) If you need help feeding your baby, contact your breeder, or an Avian Vet Immediately.

#24 quakerbaby3

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Posted 20 August 2011 - 09:18 PM

I just bought a new Quaker Parrot that is 3 and 1/2 months old......should i be holding him the first couple of days or let him get used to his surroundings??Also I was ging to put him in my room....is that a bad idea??

#25 Kimberly1985

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Posted 20 August 2011 - 11:06 PM

I just bought a new Quaker Parrot that is 3 and 1/2 months old......should i be holding him the first couple of days or let him get used to his surroundings??Also I was ging to put him in my room....is that a bad idea??


It really depends if he's tame or not...I began handling Yoshi right away because he begged to come out of his cage to hang out on my shoulder. With Zazu, I left him in his cage a couple days. (He still is untamed though) With Gracie, she was 7 weeks old and still on handfeeding formula so I had to handle her regularly right away.

But I'd give him at least 3 days to settle in before handling him. Everything is so new to him, new house, new cage, new toys, new people, new noises, etc. Talk to him even if you feel silly doing it. Give him praise or a treat for any progress he makes.

#26 Rexley and Molly

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 05:08 AM

Hello, I am a new owner of 2 quaker parrots that were used for breeding in the past. I am told they are around 2 years of age and have never talked. My question is: Are they now too old to be taught? When we brought them home we seporated them and took away the breeding box. Can they ever be tamed enough to be pets rater than breeders? I give them time to play together outside their cages and when they are together they get mean. I have managed to get them to step up but it is on their terms. Please any advise is welcome.



#27 Buttons

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 04:34 AM

Hey, I am getting a quaker in the next few weeks and was just wondering roughly how long they feed three times a day before dropping down to only two? (I know that all birds are different so im just looking for an estimate)
The answer of this question is really the deciding factor to how soon my Quaker can come home (:

#28 Jen_and_spiggy

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 05:51 AM

Depending on the age of the bird how old is it ?

#29 Buttons

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 06:19 PM

They actually hatched on christmas
Im just kind of looking for a rough like "oh mine dropped down to two feedings at 5 weeks" or something along those lines.

#30 Jen_and_spiggy

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 10:54 PM

About 3/4 small feeds at 5 weeks.one week is to soon I would rather wait cos so young you have to do feeds at roughly 9 pm 12am and 3am in the morning as well like a baby..

#31 katking

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 12:44 AM

hi there, i am new to this site and the quaker parrot world. i have just purchased a blue quaker parrot that is 9 weeks old, he is fully weaned and hand rared. i collect him in 5 days . his breeder is a very well known bird breeder of 40 yrs.. im wondering if its advisable to get another one in say 6 months, as i have been offered a green one too.. will this effect the talking and behaviour of my first bird, which we have named " bandit " ..



cheers , katherine :)

#32 jaytee

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 01:35 AM

Welcome to you, and Bandit. :) If you haven't yet, make sure that Bandit has something that will come home with him. Something familiar will help with the transition to a new home. ;) It can be anything simple: a toy, perch, snuggle bunny, blanket (washcloth),........ As far as getting another, baby steps ;) ....... Get to know Bandit, and he, you. Be sure the world of quaker is for you. Bringing another fid (Feathered, Finned Furred, Fuzzy kID... FID) into the flock is always a crap shoot, they may tolerate each other, they may be bestest buds, they may want to kill each other. Posted Image If you decide that YOU want another bird, go for it, but DON'T get an other bird for your bird.

Edited by jaytee, 07 March 2012 - 01:35 AM.


#33 bethleham

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 03:00 PM

Should I be bringing a quaker into my home?

You need to know the serious care that a parrot requires first. Educate yourself about the pet breeding industry and use your money to support responsible and caring breeders only! Better yet, adopt and foster the unfortunate ones who were dumped by their owners when they realized the huge commitment. A note about the money - If you are trying to find a deal to buy a parrot then its probably not the pet for you.
It's not easy or cheap to have a bird. You have to be responsible for their well being like a parent is for a human baby. They need attention, proper nutrition and supervision when out of cage. Vet visits and tests can really add up fast! They live a long time. The lifespan of a quaker parrot can be up to 30-40 years. Boarding is expensive and friends don't usually like caring for a noisy bird while you are away. Proper food, vet exams, meds, cages and toys are all things they usually require and they can be expensive. Birds are not just decoration and definitely are not a convenient pet. They are noisy, they chew just about everything and they poop a lot. You have to watch them constantly while out of cage to ensure they are not destroying your computer cords, paintings, electrical devices, any important papers you may have left out, mouse pads, plants, books, and I could really just about list everything in your house down to the mini blinds. Not to mention the illness and death that can come to them from chewing on these things. The personal distress you will experience when and if this happens is huge! They work their way deep into your heart and losing them is like losing a person. Only it's usually something you could have prevented if you had just known.
There are many hazards in the home that can cause tragedy for a well meaning person. These are outside animals that deserve to fly in a flock and be happy but because of being raised by humans cannot survive in the wild. They require more than just seeds and water in a cage. Birds are good at hiding illness and one day you rush them in because they are sick and next thing you know they have died and you beat yourself up endlessly because you may have killed your wonderful little friend before his time. I know this is intense. But I am so distraught after losing my first bird. It was before her time. She had an infection and I didn't catch it. I should have been weighing them every week because it's the earliest way to tell if they are sick. I've spent over a thousand dollars on making sure it doesn't happen to my three other birds. More money will be spent because one of the three is seriously ill right now. I'm angry that these animals were so carelessly bred in captivity in the first place. I bought one bird in a pet store to keep my first one company and I regret supporting such an industry even that one time. The rest are adopted because their owners couldn't or didn't want to care for them anymore. They are rewarding if you can make the commitment but you really need to think about how much effort, time and money you are willing to give because they require lots of all three.


#34 msdani1981

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 03:16 PM

This question has been coming up on the forum a lot lately, so I'll post the answer here.

"I just got a Quaker and it keeps biting me! Why is it doing this and how can I make it stop??"

Stop trying to handle it, your bird is telling you "No, I don't like this.".

The key word here is "just". If you just got a Quaker, no matter what age it is, you need to give it time to adjust to its new environment before you try to handle it too much. Quakers have the intelligence of a 3-4 year old human child, so just imagine what a toddler would do if it was suddlenly torn away from everything it knew and put with strangers who kept trying to handle it. You have to give it time. How much time depends on the bird. It could take a week, or it could take six months to a year, if the bird is older or has trust issues. Like people, some birds are cuddly and some are more distant.

Wait three days before you try to touch it at all. In those three days change the food, water and papers (or whatever is in the bottom of the cage), spend lots of time talking to your bird, sit next to the cage and read books aloud, sing if you want. Get your bird used to your voice.

You can also play games with your bird. Human babies generally love games where you look at them and as soon as eye contact is made, you turn your head away quickly. Parrots love that game too. A variation of that game is blinking. You make eye contact with your bird and blink. If he's comfortable, he'll blink back at you. My Cockatiel's favorite game is the tapping game. He'll tap on something (his cage bars, a perch, the coffee table, the wall...once he even tapped my head when he was up there! - anything that makes noise (well, my head didn't really make noise but I could feel it, LOL) - with his beak and I tap back to him.

Then you can start giving healthy treats through the cage bars. Some healthy treats would be peanuts or sunflower seeds (not too many of these, because they're high in fat), plain popcorn (no salt or butter), pieces of fresh fruit (dried is good too, as long as it doesn't have added sugar), small amounts of whole wheat bread (I just learned that toasted is better for them), and veggies.

Once your bird will take treats from you and eat them (not just drop or throw them), you can open the cage and LET THE BIRD COME OUT ON ITS OWN. This is extremely important. Don't reach in and try to get the bird out on your hand yet. If the bird wants to come out, it will. If it wants to come hang out on you, it will. If it bites, don't yell or say "Ouch" or anything, parrots are drama kings and queens. If you react loudly the bird will most likely bite again to get the same reaction. Calmly put the bird back on or in the cage.

I hope this helps. If anyone wants to add anything, please do! :)

Dani

#35 lexie77

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 07:34 PM

Hi im new here and really searching for advise.
My partner and I have been talking about bringing a Quaker into our lives for a few years now,
We have an appointment next week to meet some babies, im both nervous and excited!! but wondered if anyone had any advise for first time owners?
This isnt something we are entering in to lightly and so all info is valuable.

#36 QuakerFriend

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 09:08 PM

Hi, a few questions to put on here

Is there such a thing as a too big cage? Also there are the cages that are shaped kind of bumpy on top, but the bars are the same distance apart. Are these ok?

Can cage aggression ever go away completely?

What behaviors can pop up with a new bird when adjusting?

#37 lesleybrynn

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 03:02 PM

I want to get Oliver out of his cage... I know he is adjusting, but he looks sad Posted Image and when I handled him at the breeder and a little when we got home he was all loving and seemed happy. Ah the transistion stage, still trying to gather the best advice on what to do, leave him be for a day (not take him out of the cage, i will be talking and paying him attention) or start on letting him out late afternoon, evening like he will when we are on schedule. Also, to keep him in the room with Rio (cockatiel) and Perry (budgie) or keep him in another for a while... I didnt really think of that until reading others posts since he has been in the building with several other birds at the breeders since he went down to once a day feedings. And he has been weaned for over a week now.... what to do?

#38 Pitbulls

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 06:56 PM

I am going to rescue a Quaker. I have had many birds in the past the largest being a cockatiel. My gramma always had cockatoos and macaws so I got experience with them. My questions are;

 

 

*Is rescuing too much different then buying a bird?

*I am rescuing from Rainbow Feathers bird club, has anyone adopted from there and have any personal reviews about the club or the quality of it's birds?

*I have 4 budgies, how do you think they would get along if they were together during their free flight time?

*Do they form VERY good bonds with their owners even if there are other birds around? Even of another species?

 

Thanks in advance.



#39 msdani1981

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 07:48 PM

Hi Pitbulls!  Welcome to the forum, and congratulations on your new (future) addition! :)

 

Hopefully someone else can pitch in with this, but I'll do my best to answer some of your questions.

 

*Is rescuing too much different then buying a bird?

 

It depends on the situation the bird is coming from, the bird's age, and the amount (and quality) of handling it has had throughout its lifetime.  When you bring your "baby" home, talk softly to it whenever you're feeding, changing water and bedding.  Talk softly when you pass by the cage, basically telling your new friend that you know it's scared and confused, but that you love it and it will be okay.  It's amazing what Quakers can comprehend.

 

*I am rescuing from Rainbow Feathers bird club, has anyone adopted from there and have any personal reviews about the club or the quality of it's birds?

 

I've never heard of them, I'm sorry.  Maybe someone else has...what area do you live in?

 

*I have 4 budgies, how do you think they would get along if they were together during their free flight time?

 

It depends on the birds.  I would suggest at least a two-week quarantine period at first, as a precaution (don't want the new bird to potentially bring in some sort of illness to your current flock), and then you can introduce the birds to each other, with supervision.  Some birds immediately bond and others hate each other for life.  I would always supervise, though.  A Quaker's beak can do a lot of damage to a little budgie.

 

*Do they form VERY good bonds with their owners even if there are other birds around? Even of another species?

 

That depends on the amount of time and effort you put into your relationship with your bird, and it also depends on the bird's personality.  Chewy LOVES talking to me, and having me talk to him but I can't touch him.  Zach is his person, and yeah...he is very devoted to Zach (of course, he's a parrot and Zach does get bitten once in awhile).  Chewy's cage is next to Taz's, and the birds are out together, but Taz is "top bird" in our flock and Chewy knows it, so he doesn't mess with him.

 

I hope this helps! :)