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Uncontroleable Squawking When Trying To Hold


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8 replies to this topic

#1 jazzythebird

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 06:41 PM

I am so discouraged already an it sux. It is my first time owing a bird and it feels totally different than a dog. I got my QP two days ago and I know is soon but not sure how to go about getting my bird to get use to me. Everytime I stick my hand in the cage she starts going crazy. She runs away from me and starts to squawking really loud. I tried holding her with a glove on cause I am terrify of getting bite and she bites the glove. Please give me some tips :(

Edited by jazzythebird, 22 April 2012 - 06:51 PM.


#2 cnyguy

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 08:08 PM

Welcome! Parrots are very different from dogs. They don't instantly trust you or love you-- you have to earn their love and trust. It takes lots of time and patience, but the results are worth it. :)

It's always best to move at the parrot's pace and not force interaction. Your parrot doesn't know or trust you yet, so it's natural that she gets scared and upset when you stick your hand in her cage. Imagine if a giant hand suddenly plunged into your house and reached for you-- how would you feel? :D Gloves aren't usually recommended since they're even scarier to the parrot.

In the beginning, it works well if you just sit near your parrot's cage and talk softly to her. That helps her get used to you and the sound of your voice. You can read and sing to your parrot too. Tell her how much you love her and how happy you are to have her in your life; they really do understand when you say things like that. :) If you'd like her to come out of her cage, try leaving the door open and then let her decide when she's ready to come out. It may take a while, but parrots are much happier when they can make their own choices about such things.

Good luck to you and your QP!

#3 Keri

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 09:48 PM

It takes time and patience. Talk to her, sing to her, calmly sit next to her cage and don't try to hold her until she's ready for that. Good Luck!

#4 headfeathermistress

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 10:53 PM

Yep! Time and patience. Also, read all you can about Quakers.


Guide to a Well Behaved Parrot is a good place to start. Though it is not specifically about quakers it will help you learn about the bird perspective.

They are feisty little birds but the reward of earning their trust is worth it!



#5 Jen_and_spiggy

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 11:38 PM

You don't need a glove it does more harm than good just time and patience they will bite you a few times(it will heal and you won't die from a quaker bite) its a natural thing when they scared or upset or hormonal

#6 Bradley

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 12:12 AM

I was pretty discouraged when I first brought my QP home. Even though we had a nice bond before she came home with me, it is taking her some time to actually open up to me. She's doing much better but I know it will take much more time. She still needs to learn my schedule and I need to learn hers. We still have a lot to learn about each others personalities as well. I find it very helpful to think of her as another person in the house. Sometimes she wants space. Sometimes she wants to socialize. Sometimes she gets irritated with one of us. It's a lot like building a relationship with a new best friend. You both have a lot to learn about each other still. You two will do just fine :) Looking forward to seeing updates as you two grow closer!!

#7 jazzythebird

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 08:07 AM

How long would you say before you start seeing improvement or how long till he/she started to try to get close? Do you recommend leaving the cage open?

#8 Bradley

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 09:24 PM

How long would you say before you start seeing improvement or how long till he/she started to try to get close? Do you recommend leaving the cage open?


It really varies according to each bird. Giver her lots of love mainly by talking to her, along with the occasional treat. Once she starts to trust you she might let you pet her every so often. I was lucky and my fid started to take to me the second day I saw her (one week from the first day). She was really sketchy with me even then but I could still pet her. I believe this was due to the lack of attention from her previous owners. I imagine you'll see small improvements day by day but don't get discouraged because the effort and time will undoubtedly pay off.

About the cage thing, I leave mine open whenever I'm in the room with Patty and if I happen to leave the room, it's no longer than a few mins. If I'm leaving the house, I tend to make sure she's in her cage until I get home. She only gets out if someone else lets her out to give her some love. My girl's safety is my #1 concern :)

#9 Bene_Gesserit

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 03:06 PM

My bird was a neglected bird. When I got her, she would bite me horribly and was terrified of people. We put her cage right next to my computer desk in the living room, and left her door open all day (when either my husband or I was at the computer.) Within a week she would come out on the desk to see us, and we would reward her with a sunflower seed (they love these, but go easy on them as they are very high fat.) Within a month, we could stroke her head and she would sit on our shoulder. Now we are able to pick her up with our forearm (she is still scared of fingers but steps up on our forearm.) She flies to us wherever we are and sits on our shoulders or knees as we do whatever we're doing. I recommend letting your fid dictate when, where, and how s/he wants to interact with you, as that builds trust. Birds always bite when they are scared, so let your bird run things.

Also, even now, my bird is very territorial about her cage. I can reach in to stroke her head, but if I offer my forearm for her to come out, she bites. If, however, she comes out onto the TOP of her cage, I can then offer my arm and she will step up nicely.