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Can Two Quakers Co-Exist?


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6 replies to this topic

#1 AlaKritous

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 10:55 PM

My family obtained their first Green Quaker in May of 2013. Her name is Chief (this was before we figured out her gender) and she's a wonderful bird. Super loud during the day, quiet at night, lovely little talker. She flies around our house (I can't bear to clip her wings after seeing her fly), flies to us, and hesitantly says words to herself when she thinks no one is looking. She obviously loves us (we were lucky enough to get her back after there was a mishap and she flew free in our neighborhood) and we love her. She's spoiled rotten, and turned a year old on January 9th, 2014

 

Recently I've been tossing the idea around about getting another one, a Blue Quaker. Basically as a company provider, as well as another addition. I have no doubt that our constant interaction with both birds will render them friendly to all of the family and not just to themselves. The only thing I'm worried about is how well they will interact with each other. I understand that I will need separate cages for them in the first months of having them.

 

Basically, what are the chances, should I decide to get another, of them living together in the same cage as friends?  


Edited by AlaKritous, 09 May 2014 - 10:55 PM.


#2 Siobhan

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 11:42 PM

I would get a second cage with the intent of always having them in separate cages. A bird needs his/her own space to retreat to and putting them in the same cage will encourage them to either fight for supremacy or form a bird club that excludes the humans. They can play together out of the cages if they like each other. If they don't like each other -- and they might not! -- having separate cages will be a necessity.

 

I have two Quakers and they are not friends. Jade wanted to be friends at first and I think she still does, but Clyde rejected her decidedly and that remains his position on the matter. She defers to him as Chief Bird (he was here first) and while they do talk back and forth, they otherwise ignore each other. If I tried to put them in the same cage, there would be severe injury.



#3 AlaKritous

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Posted 10 May 2014 - 05:00 PM

My bird currently has a daytime cage as well as a nightime cage. The daytime cage is roughly double the size of the "recommended" cage size for a Quaker, while the nightime cage is simply the recommended size. Is there a good possibility--should the birds end up taking a liking to each other down the like--that they could reside in the same cage during the day while in separate during the night?

#4 Siobhan

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Posted 10 May 2014 - 06:34 PM

I have two tiels, both boys, who are bonded best buddies. They spend nearly all their time together and they do go into each other's cages, together, to play. But the door is open so if they have a spat, one can leave. I have only locked them up in the same cage together once, when we moved, to transport them a few miles across town to the new house, and during that trip they argued the whole time and when we got to the new house and I let them out, they retreated to their separate cages and had nothing to do with each other for several days. Really, I began to think they'd never be friends again. And it's a FIVE MINUTE trip between the two houses, 10 if you have to wait for a train. The only difference was that they were locked up together instead of the door being open so they could leave if they wanted to.



#5 Sharyn and Mr Piggy

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Posted 10 May 2014 - 07:31 PM

I housed a budgie and tiel together once, budgie was female, tiel was male.

 

The tiel decided he didnt want anything to do with me after a few months of living with the budgie.

 

The budgie loved me, she was a great bird, regardless of who she lived with.

 

(have I mentioned lately how much I adore budgies?)



#6 Oteyspeople

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 01:21 PM

I agree with the 2 cages. They definitely need their own space (don't we all?). You might think about letting them share a neutral play area though. They might decide to be nice to each other.

 

Our quakers have separate cages, but the doors are opened every morning. Except for exchanging a series of squawks just before afternoon nappy, they pretty much ignore each other. Otey is bonded to me, and Aldo to my husband. So we don't really have any jealousy issues between the birds.

 

Our guys really are like toddlers in that they don't play *with* each other as much as adjacent to each other. Otey likes to steal Lovey's food, and Lovey thinks she owns the place anyway. Other than the occasional beak fight, we haven't had any trouble with them sharing the larger space. But everyone's cage is their own.



#7 Bene_Gesserit

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Posted 03 June 2014 - 06:00 AM

My bird currently has a daytime cage as well as a nightime cage. The daytime cage is roughly double the size of the "recommended" cage size for a Quaker, while the nightime cage is simply the recommended size. Is there a good possibility--should the birds end up taking a liking to each other down the like--that they could reside in the same cage during the day while in separate during the night?

It's been my experience that when birds are together often (such as sharing a cage during the day) they become more involved with each other and less involved with their humans. This leads to a lot of rehoming because few people want parrots who don't want to interact. The pair can also become less tame.


Edited by Bene_Gesserit, 03 June 2014 - 06:01 AM.