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Is A Quaker Right For Me.


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#1 waylon

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Posted 18 May 2014 - 05:04 AM

Hello I am 17 about to turn 18 and have always loved birds although I only ever had one when I was three his name was buddy and he was a wild lorakeet or something to that effect I could not touch him but loved to talk and listen to him I loved him very much I had him for a year then one day his cage got blown over while my mother had him out and he flew away I cried for a vey long time I have since wanted a bird but my father never liked them and wasn't aloud to have them now he don't care as long as it doesn't wake him up because he works nights he sleeps all day need less to say I want to know if a quaker is right for me I'm looking for a bird that is sweet and wants to be with me when I'm home is medium sized and has the ability to talk (although it's not a deal breaker) and isn't a screamer and can live 25-40 years I would love a quaker or ring neck as from all the research I have done these to are my favorites I started looking into a bird two months ago when my mom said its time to put the dog down he was my best friend for 14 years and was put down two days ago... Any help is greatly appreciated!

#2 Allee

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Posted 18 May 2014 - 09:14 AM

Hello there, I'm not sure if you are new to the forum, but if so, Welcome. I'm so sorry you lost your dog after fourteen years.

There are lots of bird species to consider when you are looking for a new family member. Since your father sleeps during the day, a noisy parrot could become a real issue. All parrots are noisy, especially when they flock call mornings and evenings. They will also get loud if they aren't receiving enough attention or having all their needs met. Quakers are medium sized birds but they can get extremely loud. It will be tough to find any parrot species that will be quiet all day while you are out and sweet and tame while you are home. Both quakers and IRN's require a lot of time and attention, and both can be nippy. Quakers are more likely to talk than IRN's but there is no guarantee that any bird will talk. While you are doing research you should also look into the cost of an appropriate sized cage, toys and food, it can get expensive. Just some things to think about before you make your decision. Good luck and please let us know what you decide. :)

#3 msdani1981

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Posted 18 May 2014 - 01:23 PM

I think a better choice would be a Pionus.  They are medium sized, more mild-mannered than Quakers, and aren't known to be loud like Quakers are.  Like Allee said, ALL birds make noise.  My family members, who don't like birds, even considered my budgies "loud" and they were really quiet compared to Chewy the Quaker.  They are more expensive than Quakers and may be harder to find.

 

From About.com:

 

Blue Headed Pionus:

BlueHeadedPionus_zps1b200c27.jpg

 

Common Names:

Named for their colorful and eye-catching feathers, these birds are commonly known as the Blue Headed Pionus, or, more simply, the Blue Headed Parrot.
 
Origin:
The wild Blue Headed Pionus makes its home in the tropical areas of Costa Rica, Central America, and South America, where it thrives in humid areas and nests in forest trees. However, it has been kept in captivity for many years, and this has led the Blue Headed Pionus to be beloved as a pet in homes all over the world.
 
Size:
The Blue Headed Pionus is a medium to large sized parrot. At maturity, these types of birds typically reach lengths of up to 12 inches when measured from beak to tail. They are relatively stocky parrots, like other types of Pionus, and adults generally weigh in the neighborhood of 8 to 9 ounces when at a healthy weight.
 
Average Lifespan:
Like other Pionus species and most hookbills, a healthy, well taken care of Blue Headed Pionus can be expected to live up to 40 years in captivity -- and some have even been documented to live even longer. Because of their exceptionally long lifespan and the attention that is required when caring for a pet bird, potential owners are strongly cautioned to do plenty of research and make sure that they are ready to commit to caring for one of these birds before adopting one.
 
Temperament:
The Blue Headed Pionus, like other Pionus parrots, has a reputation for being independent while at the same time remaining closely bonded and devoted to their owners. They enjoy interacting with their human family members, playing games, and amusing themselves with plenty of bird toys. Many owners have reported that they have easygoing, gentle personalities, and that they tend to not bite as much as other species -- although they are certainly capable of doing so if they take an inclination. Pionus parrots in general are also widely reported to be among the more quiet types of parrot species, especially for their size.
 
Colors:
The beautiful plumage of the Blue Headed Pionus is responsible for the bird's name as well as its immense popularity among pet owners. The body of these birds is mainly a bright green color, with bronze overtones on the upper parts of the wings. The head is a bright and brilliant blue color, and this continues to the mid part of the bird's breast. They have darker, dusty colored circles on each of their cheeks, and red feathers on the undersides of their tails, as all Pionus parrots do. Another distinctive feature of these birds is a characteristic red patch on the upper mandible of the beak.
 
Feeding:
Like all parrots, ample attention should be paid to the nutritional content of the Blue Headed Pionus' diet. In captivity, these birds tend to do best when they are fed a high quality commercial pelleted diet, supplemented with a seed mix formulated for large birds. These foods should always be served in conjunction with a variety of fresh bird-safe fruits and vegetables to ensure that they are getting the proper amounts of vitamins. These parrots also normally enjoy a variety of homemade bird treats such as bird bread recipes, sprouts, and other nutritious creations.
 
Exercise:
Pionus parrots are very active, and they need lots of room to play and exercise each day. That said, anyone who is interested in owning one of these birds should make sure that they have time in their schedules to give their pets 3 to 4 hours outside of the cage per day, at a minimum. This out of cage playtime should be strictly supervised and should occur in a bird-proof area as Pionus are very curious and could get into an accident if left to their own devices.
 
Blue Headed Pionus as Pets:
Beautiful and loving, the Blue Headed Pionus has enjoyed great popularity as a pet for many years, and it seems that this trend is not in danger of diminishing. While they are charming, easygoing birds, it cannot be stressed enough that they are not the best pets for everybody. If you are thinking about adopting a Blue Headed Pionus, you should definitely do plenty of research to make sure that your lifestyle is suited to caring for one of these birds. Contact a local breeder or an aviculture society in your area and speak with people who have experience keeping and raising Blue Headed Pionus parrots. They will be able to guide you to the proper resources that will help you to decide if a Blue Headed Pionus is in fact the right bird for you.
 
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Maximillian's Pionus:
MaximilliansPionus_zps8cf850bf.jpg

 

Common Names:

When referring to these birds, aviculturists often refer to them as Maximilian's Pionus, Scaly Headed Parrots, or the Scaly Headed Pionus. Either name is acceptable, although Maximilian's Pionus seems to be the most widely used.
 
Origin:
Maximilian's Pionus originate in the forests and wooded areas of South America, specifically in range from Brazil to Argentina. Because of their popularity in the pet trade in recent years, however, the Maximilian's Pionus is kept in captivity in homes all over the world.
 
Size:
The typical Maximilian's Pionus can reach lengths of up to 12 inches from head to tail at maturity, although it is more common for these birds to be in the range of 10 to 11 inches tall. A healthy weight for an adult bird of this species would be in the range of 8 to 9 ounces.
 
Average Lifespan:
Like all parrots, the Maximilian's Pionus can be expected to live for quite a long time. In fact, these birds typically live for up to 40 years as pets in captivity, and some can live for even longer. This is why it is so important for those who are thinking about adopting one of these birds to do plenty of research on the species before bringing one home -- caring for any animal for 40 years or more is a long term commitment that should not be taken lightly.
 
Temperament:
Those who own Maximilian's Pionus describe their personalities as fun-loving, comical, affectionate, and a little bit mischievous. Certainly, these traits can be true of all hookbills, but the charm of the Maximilian's Pionus seems to set them apart from even other Pionus species. They are known to be the best talkers among the Pionus, building impressive vocabularies and taking well to trick training. This could be because the Maximilian's Pionus enjoys spending quite a bit of time with their owners. Anyone interested in adopting one of these birds should make sure that they have plenty of time to spend playing, socializing, and interacting with their feathered friend.
 
Colors:
In terms of colorful plumage the Maximilian's Pionus often gets overlooked in favor of more brightly feathered parrots. At first glance, these birds might appear dingy or even drab, but a closer look reveals real beauty in their coloration. The predominant color on these birds is a brownish olive green, but is highlighted by a golden bronze type of sheen on their undersides. Their heads are covered in darker colored feathers edged in lighter gray, a feature which gave rise to their being called "scaly headed parrots" by some. The brightest parts of these parrots, by far, are their tails. The tailfeathers of a Maximilian's Pionus are a rainbow of green, blue, and red, adding the perfect finishing touch to these neat looking birds.
 
Feeding:
Like other types of parrots, most Maximilian's Pionus do well in captivity when fed a high quality seed and pellet mix, supplemented daily with fresh fruits and vegetables. Like some other types of birds, Maximilian's Pionus are known to be prone to obesity, so it is recommend to closely watch their intake of high fat options such as sunflower seeds and nuts. They also need a higher intake of certain vitamins than other birds, particularly Vitamin A. To supply this, many who own Maximilian's Pionus make sure that their diet includes plenty of fresh, leafy greens such as spinach, romaine lettuce, and kale.
 
Exercise:
Maximilian's Pionus need plenty of exercise in order to maintain the best physical condition possible. For more healthy birds, it's recommended that they are allowed at least 3 to 4 hours outside of their cage each day in a supervised, bird-proof setting. This give them the opportunity to play, stretch, and make sure that all their muscle groups get a nice workout.
 
Maximilian's Pionus as Pets:
Known as one of the more quiet bird species, Maximilian's Pionus might be a good choice for those who want a larger parrot but don't want to have to deal with the extra screaming and noise that comes along with a bird like a Macaw or Cockatoo. While they bore easily due to their high intelligence, Maximilian's Pionus who are kept properly occupied are known to make sweet and loving pets who thrive on the bond that they form with their owners. If you're interested in learning more about keeping a Maximilian's Pionus, contact a local breeder or a bird club or aviculture society in your area. These types of resources will offer you plenty of information on what it's really like to live with these types of birds, and will assist you in your decision to adopt one if you decide that a Maximilian's Pionus would be a good fit for your family.

 

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Bronze-Winged Pionus

BronzeWingedPionus_zpsf79809eb.jpg

 

Common Names:

Not a bird that has several nicknames like some other species, these are known simply as the Bronze Winged Pionus, although the name is sometimes hyphenated to read Bronze-Winged Pionus.
 
Origin:
Like many other types of Pionus parrots, the Bronze Winged Pionus hails from South America. These birds prefer to spend their time in the woodlands and forested areas as opposed to plains, as they like to seek shelter and cover in the foliage. Popular in captivity, the Bronze Winged Pionus can be found in pet homes all over the world.
 
Size:
The Bronze Winged Pionus is most accurately described as a medium sized parrot, measuring in at around 11 inches in length from head to tail at maturity. They are often described as having a squat or stocky body type, and generally weigh between 7 and 9 ounces as adults. While they aren't an especially large parrot, it's worth mentioning that the Bronze Winged Pionus always appreciates a large cage. If you're considering adopting one of these birds, plan to set your feathered friend up with the largest accommodations that you can manage.
 
Average Lifespan:
Like other types of parrots the Bronze Winged Pionus can live for a very long time when kept as a pet. A good general life expectancy for these birds would be in the neighborhood of 25 years, provided that they receive proper care. However, it's important to remember that this can vary greatly among individual birds depending on the quality of their diets, cleanliness of their habitats, and other factors. A good rule is to opt not to adopt one of these birds unless you are prepared to make a commitment to care for your pet for up to 30 years.
 
Temperament:
The Bronze Winged Pionus is known for having a gentle and calm disposition for a parrot. They form very strong bonds with their owners, and they revel in being able to spend time with them. Plenty of social interaction is an important key to the successful keeping of a Bronze Winged Pionus. Those interested in adopting one of these birds should make sure that they can devote a significant amount of each day to playing and interacting with their pet. Some Bronze Winged Pionus may have a tendency to become "one person" birds, showing extreme devotion to their owners and shunning attention from other people. Those adopting a young Bronze Winged Pionus are encouraged to have their entire family interact with the bird regularly, in an effort to prevent this type of behavior.
 
Colors:
These are very uniquely colored birds -- once you know what a Bronze Winged Pionus looks like, you aren't likely to forget! Mature adult birds display mostly dark bluish-purple plumage that is peppered with white and pink feathers under their chins and on their chests. They have a pink ring of bare skin around their eyes, a yellow beak, and light, flesh colored legs and feet. The feathers on their shoulders and backs are predominantly a bronze-green color, which gives these birds their name. There is a red patch of feathers underneath their tails, a characteristic of all Pionus parrots.
 
Feeding:
Like all pet birds, the Bronze Winged Pionus does best on a diet that consists of a high quality seed and pellet mix, combined and supplemented with a variety of fresh foods such as fruits, vegetables, berries, and nuts.
 
Exercise:
These are extremely active birds, and they need to be given an ample amount of time outside of their cages each day to exercise and work their muscles. As a rule, you should provide a Bronze Winged Pionus with a minimum of 3 - 4 hours per day outside of the cage. To keep the bird occupied, try giving him or her an assortment of safe toys to pay with during their out of cage time. This will help keep your bird mentally as well as physically stimulated.
 
Bronze Winged Pionus as Pets:
While Bronze Winged Pionus parrots are eye-catching and desirable as pets, they are not the best choice for every bird owner. As mentioned above, there is a risk that these types of birds can develop a preference for one specific person, meaning that they may not be the best choice for families. To discover more about what it's like to live with a Bronze Winged Pionus, do plenty of research by contacting a local breeder or aviculture society for advice before bringing one home. Taking your time when making the decision about whether or not to adopt one of these unique parrots is key to making sure that you're making a solid decision about whether or not a Bronze Winged Pionus is the right bird for you.

Edited by msdani1981, 18 May 2014 - 01:28 PM.


#4 Siobhan

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Posted 18 May 2014 - 04:25 PM

You might also consider a cockatiel. They're pretty easy to get along with and mine, at least, aren't noisy as parrots go. If you only have one bird, he/she will depend on you for companionship and will be easier to tame and keep tame. If you get a hand-raised baby it will be tame to begin with. Mine nip occasionally, but not often, and one of them can talk but not terribly well. They whistle very well though, and can learn to mimic a variety of whistles. Quakers are probably not the best choice if noise is an issue.



#5 msdani1981

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Posted 18 May 2014 - 06:20 PM

Cockatiels are another excellent choice. :)



#6 waylon

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 01:05 AM

thanks everyone for your replies and I am looking into the pionus parrots. although I wanted to ask what your thoughts are on me wanting a one person bird. getting myself bit isn't a problem although I don't want it to be a bad habit but I want a bird that really only wants anything to do with me rather than other people. the reason I chose these beautiful birds is because my mother and aunt were at onetime breeders before I was around my mother had stopped but my aunt stopped three years ago and they are able to help me with anything I may need. I do work rather than attend school but I am only gone at a maximum of 8hrs a day. Another thing I had wondered about is when I get (my baby as that's what they tend to be.) do the bird halters really work and do quakers tend to like the getting out and going to the park and such? the reason I ask is because when I am home which is most of every day since my 8hr days are rare I would be keeping my bird out of ear shot of my father and spending as much if not all my free time with it this bird will be my best friend and partner in crime lol. I also have a safe and beautiful back porch were I will be able to take the bird when it wants to be loud and when im not home (my mother and soon to be bride will be around to keep an eye on it while im gone.) I really want a friend for many many years who will be there to talk to and relax with when I have even the worst of days! =)

 

p.s. cockatiels never seem to like me idk why but my aunts would always bite me when I was little and have never really liked them much since but each to there own I appreciate the advice and thought though keep it coming and if you have any advice to a good lock for my quaker cage if I decide to go with one plz let me know as they seem to be escape artists from what ive seen and read and heard thanks so much for your time sorry im long winded